The Sins of Joe Arpaio Explained by Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey

The infamous sheriff of Maricopa County has one or another reason to hit the headlines of the newspapers. Joe Arpaio recently hit the news headlines when he got the Presidential pardon though everyone expected a prison term for him.

Especially people who have experienced torture and racial profiling by him were eagerly waiting to see him behind bars.

It is not just the migrants, or the disadvantaged sections of the society experienced his brutality, but Arpaio was targeting everyone who was criticizing him including his political opponents as well. Even prominent news reporters were not spared by him. Read more: Jim Larkin | Crunchbase and Village Voice Media | Wikipedia

It was very clear when he arrested Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey for reporting a grand-jury investigation which sheriff warned them not to report. It was in 2007, both the journalists were taken by Selective Enforcement Unit of the county and handcuffed under the instruction of Joe Arpaio.

On those days, Lacey was serving as the executive editor of the news media group, Village Voice Media, and Larkin was the Chief Executive Officer of the group. Just before their arrest, they published the details of the grand-jury probe in Phoenix New Times, a newspaper from the group.

It is later identified that more than just an arrest based on the incident, Sheriff Arpaio was targeting the newsgroup as Phoenix New Times was continuously targeting Joe for his misdeeds and exposing the misdeeds done by his departments for long.

Recently, Larkin and Lacey explained the incidents that led to arrest of the journalists as well as the downfall of the sheriff.

They remember that the sheriff was notorious for a number of heinous acts including handcuffing the pregnant women to the beds even while they are going through the delivery process, extrajudicial campaigns against political foes and critics, and numerous death stories of detainees in his prisons due to intense torture.

The most highlighted vendettas were against Lacey and Larkin as well as abuse to the Latinos living in Maricopa County. The later became the reason for his downfall as it became the well-known Melendres v. Arpaio lawsuit.

While coming to the arrests of the journalists, it created immediate furor across the country as it was considered as a breach to the First Amendment rights of the journalist duo and Arpaio was forced to release both within 24 hours. Additionally, another court order, after five years, made the county liable to pay $3.7 to the journalists as compensation.

Lacey and Larkin decided to use the amount for a noble cause than for any individual needs. With that thought in mind, they established a nonprofit activist group called Frontera Fund.

The initiative plays an excellent role in addressing the migrant issues in the state of Arizona with campaigning, news coverage, help groups, financial assistance, legal assistance, and more.

While coming to Sheriff Arpaio, he could not get the mandate in November 2016, for the seventh time, considering the scandals and investigation pending against him. In the early July 2017, he caught with contempt of court on Melendres suit, which ultimately led to the Presidential pardon.

Eric Lefkofsky: Helping Cancer Patients Worldwide

Around 40 percent of the total adult population in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer sometime in the future. The disease has already claimed hundreds of millions of deaths since prehistory, and today, scientists are working overtime to fight the disease and find a way to cure it. There are more than 15 million people who are suffering from cancer in the United States, and the number is expected to rise in the near future. However, technological advances are being developed to combat the disease, and one of the companies which are working overtime to stop the progression of the disease is Tempus. Tempus was founded by Eric Lefkofsky, and he is currently specializing in data-enabled precision medicine.

With the advancement in technology, people are having the perception that the medical field is also in their advanced state, but they are wrong. The medical industry is still considered as having inferior technology, until the creation of technologies developed by Tempus. Eric Lefkofsky’s wife has been diagnosed with cancer, and he is doing his best to combat the disease to save his wife. However, the experience from taking care of his wife gave him a firsthand experience in dealing with people who have the disease. He found out that there are loopholes in the medical industry when talking about the collection of data from the patients, so Eric Lefkofsky decided to include a database and a piece of software at Tempus to fasten up the collection of important information.

The platform that was created by Eric Lefkofsky was praised by oncologists from around the world. They thanked him because of the creation of the platform that allows the oncologists to save their discoveries inside a large database that can be accessed anytime they wish. With the creation of Tempus, Eric Lefkofsky is hoping that the oncologists working 24/7 could finally develop the treatment that everyone is waiting for. Eric Lefkofsky admitted that it will be a long way before the cure for cancer can be developed, but he assured the public that Tempus is working with all the parties involved to ensure that the cure for cancer will be discovered in his lifetime.

How Injustice Is Fueling The Fight For Justice

The co-founders of the Phoenix News Times and Village Voice Media created the Frontera Fund to fight for civil, human and migrant rights in the state of Arizona.

The $3.75 million settlement awarded Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin as the results of a suit against the Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio is now being used to fund such causes as the Arizona Justice Project, the Arizona D REAM Act Coalition, Center for Neighborhood Leadership and the American Immigration Council. October 18, 2007, Sheriff Joe Arpaio sent deputies known as the “Selective Enforcement Unit” to handcuff and arrest Mike Lacy and Jim Larkin.

The two co-founders were at the mercy of the man who called himself “America’s Toughest Sheriff because the Phoenix News Times published reports of his abuses of power, financial irregularities and mismanagement of the sheriff’s office.

After being forcibly removed from their homes, shoved into unmarked SUVs with Mexican license plates, the executives were later booked into separate jails. Sheriff Arpaio and his allies at the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office had subpoenas for information such as writers, editors and readers including the readers’ personal browsing histories and IP addresses. All charges were dropped against Lacey and Larkin as a result of a loud national outcry and the two were released from jail withing 24 hours.

After the court ruled that the subpoenas were unlawful and Lacey and Larkin were arrested without probable cause, the $3.7 million was awarded in 2013.

The Frontera Fund was earmarked to help the Hispanic community that had been the victims of racial and civil rights abuses in Arizona. Larkin said he think that the Mexican immigrants who braved the desert to travel to Arizona for work and economic opportunity are a deserving group.

Mike Lacey spoke of the demonizing behavior of Sheriff Joe Arpaio toward Mexican migrants as well as anyone with brown skin, American citizens or not, promoted fear. Fear was further promoted by an advertisement that ran during the 2014 election showing Mexicans crossing the border as ISIS terrorist.

Mike Lacey pointed out that in this country, were are all migrants. With the Statue of Liberty as a constant invitation to the downtrodden to come, the Frontera Fund is helping to deliver on that promise.The Dreamers are more worthy of that promise than most because it was not their choice to be on American soil but one of life’s circumstances.

They have lived their entire lives as Americans, socialized, educated and participating in all the responsibilities of American citizenship. It is unfair to punish this generation. It can be compared to raising animals in captivity than throwing them out in the wild. It is good that the Frontera Fund is looking out for their interest and well being.

It’s No Longer Dating As Usual With Whitney Wolfe’s App, Bumble

Whitney Wolfe who co-founded the dating app Tinder has now brought to the world another dating app, Bumble, which as she says, is unapologetically feminist. The principal characteristics of the app are that women are always the first to make a move.

Bumble, which is headquartered in Austin Texas. In its short time of existence, the app is reported to have attracted over 500 00, users who spend an average of 62 minutes per day on it. Still, the ratio of women to men using the app is higher just as Whitney Wolfe had envisioned. The app is currently free although it is accepted to monetize in the near future.

Among the chief drivers for Bumble is a need to change the dating landscape, with the concern of the bullying nature witnessed on most dating. Among its features is photo verification that decreases users’ fear of being lured into an online relationship with a false identity. The company cites an abuse rate of 0.0005 percent.

Bumble is indeed set to disrupt dating rules as it encourages women to make the first move. The approach is radical and may not apply to the strict followers of dating rules if any such rules ever existed.

Read more: Bumble’s Whitney Wolfe: ‘I’m worried we’re alienating the good guys’

According to Whitney Wolfe, Bumble has so far made significant inroads and has drawn valuable lessons along the way.

Besides the radical approach that Bumble is using, it is also championing online accountability as seen through its photo messaging option. Matched users can send pictures to each other but the photos are watermarked with their names. This discourages the exchange of photos that would only result in a negative effect and experience for the user.

In introducing the app to the mass market Whitney Wolfe borrowed from her experience in Tinder and used universities and colleges as her entry point

At just 27 years of age and with the courage to delve into controversial waters, Whitney Wolfe is bound to make a mark in the digital market bubble.